Boring is the New Scary

boredThis month, we’re talking about what scares us. I grew up reading whatever the adults around me laid down, and my mom was a horror buff. Stephen King, Dean Koontz, Peter Straub. The Good stuff. (Horror shout-out: Anyone else reading Doctor Sleep this month?)

Who’s a scaredy-cat? This girl.

I was never the kid not scared of anything. I was prone to night terrors and listening in the dark, long after everyone else went to bed, for creaks and whispers. Which, actually, was more of a heaping dollop of anxiety than fear.

As I got older, the things keeping me up at night stopped being faceless monsters and turned into worries like, Do we have enough in savings if something terrible happened? or How would I raise the kids alone if my husband had an accident? Scary, grown-up stuff.

What if nothing happens?

Then, after some soul-searching and crazy living, I realized my own deepest fear was being mundane. What if I never do anything magnificent? What if I never get to stand at some random podium and thank the people in my life because everyone else in the room is applauding me? Are there awards for being really good at assisting in the creation of 2nd grade science projects? I just can’t imagine that fitting on a trophy.

Am I being a total drag and ruining good-time, scary month for everyone else?

At some point, I realized the monsters are actually people and the enemy is time and maybe-tomorrow. Thing is, I’m pretty sure I’m not the only one. I have a sneaking suspicion that tons of people feel this way. They see time slipping by as nothing great happens. They wonder if they’re up to the task of… an interesting life.

Don’t get me wrong–I wouldn’t trade my kids, or my husband, or worrying about which laundry detergent gives me the best value for the world. Not even for a room full of strangers tossing roses at my feet.

It’s just… these are the things that keep me up at night. And so, I’ll read about a spunky heroine rebelling against societal norms or a recovering alcoholic defying the supernatural for a second chance at life. Because those stories, those endings and victories, make me believe.  My day will come.

How about you?

Sure, the zombie apocalypse if crazy scary, but what every day concern scares you? Don’t forget, one winner will be chosen at random this month from all the comments to win an e-copy of Sutton Fox‘s romantic suspense, Beyond the Winner’s Circle plus a $10 Amazon Gift Card!

About Lori Sizemore

Lover of nail polish, pens, her Kindle, and fresh coffee. She likes romance filled with messy, real characters and lots of snarky banter. Reading was (and still is!) her BFF; when she discovered writing she fell in love. Come for the snark. Stay for the story.
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8 Responses to Boring is the New Scary

  1. Carrie says:

    I can totally relate to this. It is my fear as well. To not be remembered for something, I mean just my kid telling his kid(s) things about me. A Noble Prize is not necessary. If I am boring then there will be no stories to tell, then my worse fear will come true.

    I am not a religious person but I truly believe in “Carrie’s version of reincarnation” which is this: All the moments you have in this world leave memories with others. The memories are shared with others and others and other. So you will always live on.

  2. Great post! I think my biggest fear is that something will happen to me before my youngest child is grown. But then I start to think about future grandkids. I have to shut down my thoughts and focus that energy on trying to stay as healthy as possible because it is the one thing I can control. I try not to think about the things that could happen that I can’t control.

  3. Bethanne says:

    I find myself worried about other drivers. The longer I drive, the older I get, the more I worry about crosssing that next intersection… wrong place, wrong time. You know all the awful stories we hear. Killed by a drunk driver, texting and driving, sleeping at the wheel, just plain old negligent.

    I don’t want to die!! hahaha. 😀 yep. OTOH, I’ve never been a scary movie person. I do love the thrill, but I must watch in day time and with another person. I do NOT watch alone and in the dark. Once, I watched “what lies beneath” all by myself…after dark. I was a smoker then, too. And I went outside afterward to smoke… could not stick it out.

    😀 😀 LOL I was scared!

  4. By nature, I’m a worrier. I think it’s why I ended up being a writer. My mind automatically turns to the worst case scenario. On the same note, I also have hope that in the end everything is going to turn out okay. Maybe that’s why we write romance – lots of conflict but there’s always a happily-ever-after at the end.

  5. Nina Croft says:

    I think everyone worries, but as writers we’re almost programmed to worry too much. It’s the whole “what if” thing and we have to come up with the worst possible scenario. I was running this morning on this really quiet road when a car came past me and pulled up just ahead . I was like…serial killer. It had to be, but just as I came up level with it, a police car came around the corner (that serial killer had a near miss!) I was relating this to my other half when I got back and he was …you worry way too much!

    But I do hate it when you wake in the night and start thinking of everything that could go wrong – with me it’s usually health related, but I am getting on a bit.

  6. Sutton Fox says:

    The longer I live the more change I see in everything. Some of it I embrace, and some I’m sure will be the death of me. It seems so many things are beyond my influence. And in the dark of night, I wonder if our parents and their parents felt the same way.

  7. These are such awesome responses! I was on the fence about this topic, but it demanded to be written.

    Carrie: You’re absolutely right. I want to be the interesting great grandmother who did… something awesome. Something worth telling people about.

    Chelle: That’s a huge fear for me as well. I know no one will teach my kids, parent my kids, like me. And they need *me.*

    Bethanne: I had a small fender-bender earlier this summer, down in my neighborhood, and it affected me so much because I thought, “What if it had been a kid instead of a car in that curve.” It made me feel much more vulnerable to other drivers because I’m not infallible.

    Julie: I agree, that’s the draw of romance. There’s a HEA, everything is resolved, and the difficult times serve to help us grow.

    Nina: I actually blogged about that once, because I always feel like serial killer bait. In my head, I’m constantly thwarting them, lol.

    Sutton: Yes! It makes me feel connected to this long line of life and worries as I see my parents getting older, my grandparents.

  8. As a parent I can definitely relate. Instead of falling peacefully asleep each night, as the parent of two teen drivers, I lay there listening for the cars to come home. I’m praying the phone won’t ring after midnight. I worry when the weather is bad.

    You’re right, even the boring lives we sometimes lead can be pretty darn scary. Growing old is scary, the thoughts of will I have regrets or will I be able to take care of myself and not be a burden to my kids.

    Lots to think about. 🙂

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