Tasty Fare

Please accept my humble apologies for this late post. Swimming upstream today it seems. But let’s get started anyway.

Food. Nourishment. Sustenance. Call it whatever you want, it’s a big part of American culture. I can’t speak personally for any other countries, but Americans seem to celebrate every occasion with a meal of some kind.

It’s only natural that this would carry over into our writing. Landra Graf’s post about writing and food made me think about my own. There is at least one meal shared between the characters in each of my novels and sometimes more than one.

CakeMeals are great for getting characters together and moving the plot forward. Plus they are such a part of my life, I guess I make them part of my characters’ lives as well. I love them. And I can tell a lot about a person by how they order in a restaurant. So it’s a natural fit to me that a group of characters gathering for a meal would reveal things about themselves, whether accidentally or on purpose. Everyone has tells.

Truth be told, I’m a food person. Food fascinates me. Cooking does not come easily or naturally to me, but that’s another post. Perhaps that’s why I enjoy a really good meal cooked by someone else.

Traveling around the U.S. fairly frequently, I may not be able to tell you where we slept, or exactly how long it took to get somewhere, but I can tell you a really good restaurant in the area. And some of them have been quite surprising. Here are just a couple locales with memorable food.

Best Tex-Mex – Norman, OK. Best deep dish pizza – Chicago, IL. Best red beans and rice – Covington, GA. Best traditional Mexican, San Francisco, CA. Best chicken and waffles – Houston, TX. Best sushi, EVER, Fairhope, AL.

Why these things stick with me, I have no idea. I’m still looking for the best mac and cheese. So far, no luck.

Do you have a favorite food you love to have when you go out to eat?

About Sutton Fox

Sutton Fox has been published by Lyrical Press, Gypsy Shadow Publishing and wrote a bi-monthly column for an auto racing magazine for several years. She traded life in Bluegrass Country for life in the Windy City in a home she shares with The Man, a lonely cat, and her beloved dog, Lucy. When she’s not working the edj, you can find her writing or spending time with her extended family.

Unexpected Gifts

Many years ago, when I set out to write my first novel, all I could think about was the story. Where would these characters go? How would they get there? Who would accompany them on their journey? Would anyone even want to read about them?UnderDeckFlowers

After all these years, it’s still about the story. But I’ve received some priceless unexpected gifts along the way. And they are the relationships I’ve cultivated with other writers. The people who ‘get’ me and the things I worry about. And the things I want to work toward.

When I started out, it never occurred to me that I would meet some of my best friends on this journey. Everyone says writing is a solitary occupation, and it is to some degree. But the support of my fellow writers, those who’ve reached out to help me along the way have made a wonderful impact on my life, and I’m so very thankful for all of my writer friends.

They’ve turned out to be kind of like this petunia I discovered under my deck today. A beautiful, unexpected gift waiting for me in a place I never thought to look.*

Hope you’re all enjoying your summer!

 

*(And just for the record, I didn’t plant or buy any petunias this year.) But nevertheless, it’s still a lovely surprise. Lucy was disappointed it wasn’t something to eat.

About Sutton Fox

Sutton Fox has been published by Lyrical Press, Gypsy Shadow Publishing and wrote a bi-monthly column for an auto racing magazine for several years. She traded life in Bluegrass Country for life in the Windy City in a home she shares with The Man, a lonely cat, and her beloved dog, Lucy. When she’s not working the edj, you can find her writing or spending time with her extended family.

Guest Post — Lynn Cahoon

Researching or how to make it to the front of the line at the bookstore.

When I was thinking about The Council series, I wanted to be accurate in my portrayal of a witch out of water. Parris McCall doesn’t know she’s a witch when the story starts. Sure, weird things are more likely to happen to her than to others. And once, when head cheerleader, Brittany the bright, made fun of Parris, one too many times, the queen bee’s hair turned pink.  In English class. In front of the entire junior class.

amemberofthecouncilWhen she got home from school that day, Gran had weaved this fairy tale about her powers and her parents, but even then, Parris had refused to accept or even listen.

So what was an unknowing witch to do?

I didn’t have a clue.

As in most cases, when I’m looking for answers, I visit the information mecca. No, not the internet. I went to the library. There I found all sorts of historical books about the Salem witchcraft trials along with some basic Wiccan handbooks. Not a lot. Most of the how to books were in the area of Tarot reading or horoscopes. I live in a small, conservative town.

After racing through all those books, and probably getting a warning code attached to my library card in case of a plague of locusts or roving witch hunters, I hit the book store.

Visiting the book store actually gave me more options in books. I bought a handbook of spells, one on elementary magic, and one boasting an encyclopedia of spells, castings, and potions.

When I got in line with my treasures, you could see the tension when people around me noticed my choice of reading material. Several stepped aside, mumbling how they’d forgotten something.  And I hadn’t cast even a little spell.

I’m still researching for the last book of the series. Picking up bits and pieces here and there, I’ll use my writer magic to weave together into a story that finishes Ty and Parris’s quest. Or at least that’s my plan today.

What’s the most unusual subject you’ve researched?

 ****

A Member of the Council – The Council #1

A rogue hunter, a clueless witch and a mission to save an unknowing world.

Parris McCall, owner of the dive bar, The Alibi, has finally constructed a life where her

little quirks don’t show or matter to anyone. As for her grandmother’s warnings that she’s different, well, she’ll cross that bridge if she comes to it.

But when Ty walks into her bar, both lives are instantly changed.

Buy Links – http://www.amazon.com/Member-Council-Lynn-Cahoon-ebook/dp/B00IPQX0AI/

****

CahoonBIO – Lynn Cahoon’s a multi-published author. An Idaho native, her stories focus around the depth and experience of small town life and love. Lynn’s published in Chicken Soup anthologies, explored controversial stories for the confessional magazines, short stories in Women’s World, and contemporary romantic fiction. Currently, she’s living in a small historic town on the banks of the Mississippi river where her imagination tends to wander. She lives with her husband and four fur babies.

Contact Lynn at her website: www.lynncahoon.wordpress.com

FaceBook: https://www.facebook.com/LynnCahoonAuthor

Twitter: https://twitter.com/LynnCahoon

About Beth Rhodes

Beth jumps into life with both feet...or head first. Impulsive and spontaneous to a T, she joined Passionate Critters and never looked back. She loves writing and reading, which made this wonderful group of woman a perfect match for her.

Guest Post — Jill Hughey

Happy Halloween!! What better way to celebrate this holiday than with the author of a book called Little Witch. Don’t forget, today is the last day to enter our monthly drawing so come on in and give Jill a warm welcome. 🙂

~*~*~

Nothing Says Halloween Like “Medieval”

jillHi, I’m Jill Hughey and I write the Evolution Series of historical romance set in the medieval age following Charlemagne’s death, in Francia and Bavaria. Just the word “medieval” makes us think of things going bump in the night, dark stone chambers, a dirty old hag stirring a cauldron that emits green steam.

The practice of “magic” was fairly common but also illegal in Charlemagne’s Empire. The Christian church fought the old religions with every weapon at hand. They cut down sacred trees and forbade sacrifices and demanded that the bodies of the dead be placed in Christian cemeteries. Those practicing the old rituals were punished. Those suspected of using the old ways to harm other people were usually killed, along with anyone who was believed to help them.

The most commonly used medieval magic centered on healing or protection. People weren’t trying to do anything evil. They just wanted their sick child to recover, or their horse to remain healthy for the summer, or to know what the future would bring. They waited for favorable days for spinning and traveling. They married on Friday (Venus’s Day) without even remembering the even older religion that started that tradition.

There were less noble brews or incantations to incite a lover’s passion or stunt the growth of your neighbor’s grain. Even some nuns and priests resorted to such practices. Eventually Christianity created its own recitations for the common people to use, and absorbed the major pagan holidays into its own calendar. The church compromised in order to transition the population to its dictates.

Amidst all this, I’ve set four books and short story. Religion has been present in the books to the extent that characters have entered churches for mass or wedding ceremonies. In my most recent book, Little Witch: Historical Romance Novella, I delve into the danger of superstition and the well-documented power the accusation of witchcraft has carried throughout history.

Witch200x300Salena, my heroine, is not a witch, but a vicious neighbor — with her own motivations — has labeled her as one, making her an outcast in their small community. As the situation deteriorates, Salena finds some happiness in her friendship with Nox, the Lord of Ribeauville’s servant, though he withholds his love, scarred by the childhood loss of his entire family. Salena runs away to protect her family from a particularly pointed threat against them, and Nox realizes that she has also run away with his heart.

“The night is dark. The moon is bright. She brings his heart into her light.”

Little Witch: Historical Romance Novella is available at Amazon in print and for Kindle http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00EUA1TI8

If you want to keep in touch with Jill Hughey, she blogs at http://jillhughey.blogspot.com, is on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jillhugheyromance, and tweets @jillhughey.

It’s been great fun to visit on Heart-Shaped Glasses! Happy Reading!

About Beth Rhodes

Beth jumps into life with both feet...or head first. Impulsive and spontaneous to a T, she joined Passionate Critters and never looked back. She loves writing and reading, which made this wonderful group of woman a perfect match for her.

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