Judging a Book by its Cover

“Why, it’s one o’ the books I bought at Partridge’s sale. They was all bound alike — it’s a good binding, you see — and I thought they’d be all good books. . . . but they’ve all got the same covers, and I thought they were all o’ one sample, as you may say. But it seems one musn’t judge by th’ outside. This is a puzzling world.”
–George Eliot, The Mill on the Floss

perf5.000x8.000.inddMarin here, and today I’m thinking about the puzzling world of book covers. Recently I worked with a cover artist–the very talented Rae Monet–to create the cover for my third book.

A cover’s primary purpose, of course, is to convince the reader to buy the book behind it. A great cover not only entices the reader, but captures the story in some way.  Cover artist Peter Mendelsund says “his job is ‘finding that unique textual detail that…can support the metaphoric weight of the entire book.’”   But beyond that, a cover needs to represent the book. The mood of the cover should match that of the book–a couple in a clinch for a romance, something dark and eerie for a paranormal, an illustration for a children’s book. Even things like font matter–you see the font that was used on the Harry Potter books, and you recognize it immediately.  The cover, according to Smashwords founder, Mark Coker, should be a promise to the reader. A promise that the book is as professional as its cover, that it is of the genre depicted by the cover, and that you will enjoy reading it.

There are plenty of sites out there which discuss the elements that make a great cover, and I list a few of them below. But as one of them points out, what really makes a great cover is what makes you purchase the book. I tend to like covers that are more abstract, that hint at the character of the book without revealing too much. Here are some of my favorites (click on the covers to visit the book’s Goodreads entry):

Deanna Raybourn was new to me, and I picked up her book in the library almost entirely because of the cover. The others are authors I know and like and would have read anyway. All of these covers evoke their stories and the genre. I think Julia Quinn’s cover must have worked quite well, because she has used a variation of it at least twice since then…

I asked my fellow Passionate Critters what they like, and don’t like, in a cover:

“I tend to gravitate toward books with real people on the covers. I tend to like couples too. I like feet/legs too–or just bodies with no heads–so I can get the gist of the romance while leaving something to my imagination.”

“I like illustrated covers, too, if they’re well done and not drawn by the author themselves. Actually…it’s easier to say what DOESN’T work. Go here to see some samples: http://lousybookcovers.com/.”

“I like a simple cover which conveys the mood or feel of the story that I’m buying.”

“I’ve always liked Kristan Higgins’ covers. You see a couple but not too much of their faces.”

“I’m the opposite of the others, I love faces.  At least the guy’s face, I’m OK with the back of the girl’s head.  Clinch covers work for me as well.  I want a sense of the time period, what the characters look like, and the overall mood of the book.  From the cover I should easily be able to tell if it’s a romance, sci-fi, fantasy, etc, as well as what era it’s set in, and a decent idea of what the main character, or characters, look like.  I also like to get a sense of who the characters are, is it a brooding alpha male?  Throw him in a tux and make him look angry….or heated…or both.  Character looks are huge for me, especially for the male, and nothing irks me more than grabbing a good book and then having the guy be described as someone I don’t find even remotely attractive.  It kills the whole thing for me.”

“I don’t honestly know.  Some are clearly just bad or rather lousy, but they don’t count.
But of good, well-done covers, where there’s nothing actually wrong with them…hmmm. There’s no type that appeals to me – some just look…right.
I think it’s sort of subjective to a degree – flowers and a wedding dress would put me off, because it screams sweet and I don’t particularly like sweet.
My favorite sort of covers are UF [urban fantasy], which always seem to be very distinctive of the genre, usually a beautiful background, a strong character (all of them, they never seem to have their heads chopped off) often a woman, and a few swirly bits to pretty them up.
I think it’s an arty thing (which is why I struggle) just getting the proportions and colors right and pleasing to the eye.”

“I like real people, faces, and even a bit of setting. I like to see the story. I don’t like the drawn covers–like chick lit has. And don’t get me started on the computer graphics that….are just…not real looking. LOL  But that’s just me.
I don’t like chopped off heads or flowers or wedding dresses or babies.  I don’t know what that says about me.
Oh, I also don’t like floating heads…over cities and stuff.”

Clearly, we all like different things, which only goes to show that you’ll never please everyone, no matter how brilliant your cover may be. What stands out for you in a book cover? Share your favorite!

Some other takes on what makes a great book cover:

https://selfpublishingadvisor.com/2016/08/10/the-book-beautiful-the-cover/
https://springfieldwritersguild.org/2016/08/11/dont-judge-a-book-by-its-cover/
https://www.wired.com/2014/09/makes-brilliant-book-cover-master-explains
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/05/30/book-cover-design-indies_n_3354504.html
http://www.graphic-design.com/DTG/Design/book_covers/index.html
http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/designing-book-covers/
http://www.iuniverse.com/Resources/Publishing-Distribution/CoverDesignEssentials.aspx

 

 

About Marin McGinnis

About Marin McGinnis Clevelanders are tough, a bit cynical, and just a little crazy, and Marin McGinnis is no exception. When she’s not chasing after big dogs or watching tweens skate around hockey rinks, she is immersing herself in Victorian era romance. She lives in Northeast Ohio with her husband, son, and two standard poodles named Larry and Sneaky Pete. You can find her here, at marinmcginnis.com, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, and Pinterest.

When you need a break from the news by Julie Jarnagin

DSCN7900It’s an election year. Sigh. I love our country, but election years are exhausting…especially one as crazy as this one. While I passionately believe in being an informed citizen, the constant barrage of election coverage, party conflict, and frightening news stories can make anyone feel overwhelmed.

So let’s take a stand by taking care of ourselves. How?

  1. Realize it’s okay to turn it all off. Really. You don’t have to watch the nightly news or follow CNN.com all the time. If something big happens, trust me, you’ll hear about it.
  2. Treat everyone with kindness and respect…and ignore the crazy ones. Even if that guy you knew in high school is saying something completely ridiculous about one of the candidates on Facebook, resist commenting and falling into a big debate. Unless you really love debating politics, it will leave you drained. I’m all for standing up for what you believe in, but choose your battles carefully.
  3. Speaking of Facebook – Unfollow is your friend. If you cringe every time you read a certain person’s post, unfollow them. They’ll never know. You’ll still be on their friend list but their craziness won’t show up in your newsfeed.  You’re welcome.
  4. Read a good book. This is one of the things I love about being a writer. Life is hard. Being able to take a break and dive into another world helps us deal with tough realities, and stories can provide us with fresh perspectives.

So just know, no matter what your political beliefs, election season will be over soon, and no matter the outcome, there will always be good books out there to get us through.

Cowgirl in the Kitchen CoverNew Release! 
Cowgirl in the Kitchen

Just as she’s about to make her dream come true, disaster strikes. The only way she can get back in the saddle is to strike a bargain—with a man her family despises.

Jentry Lawson’s dream of becoming a world-class barrel racer is about to happen—until she and her horse are injured in a terrible accident. Forced to move back home to Texas to recuperate, her Dallas-based brother makes her an offer she can’t refuse. He needs someone he can trust to oversee the renovation and grand opening of his new restaurant. If she’ll take that on, he’ll finance her return to the arena. It doesn’t take Jentry long to discover she bit off more than she can chew. Swallowing her pride, she asks for help from Gavin Easton—a man her brother despises. But he’s the one person who can make the restaurant succeed.

People in Glover never thought Gavin Easton would amount to anything. Ever since his own restaurant in town burned down, he’s taken odd jobs to provide for his niece, whom he is raising alone. When beautiful and stubborn Jentry offers him the perfect job, his first reaction is to turn her down flat. No way he’s going to do anything to help her brother! But there’s more at stake than his pride. Can he trust his future to the woman whose brother tried to ruin his reputation—and his life?

Besides, how can he manage a restaurant, when he can’t manage his heart?

About Julie Jarnagin

Julie Jarnagin is a multi-published author of inspirational romance. She grew up in a small Oklahoma town where her family farmed and ranched. These days she lives in a not-so-big city with her amazing husband and young son who tolerate all her nerdy quirks. Julie earned a B.A. in Journalism / Professional Writing from the University of Oklahoma and is a member of American Christian Fiction Writers. www.JulieJarnagin.com

Happy Reading

I know there have been a couple summer reads posts on the blog already this month, and this is another one, but hear me out. A Facebook friend posted a “must read” list the other day, and every one of the books was intense–about mental illness, or cancer, or the Holocaust, betrayal, murder, suicide. I asked if anyone read happy books any more, and the answer was no. Really?

I will say that I don’t always read happy books, and I definitely don’t watch happy TV–I’m binge watching Bitten and Penny Dreadful at the moment–whoa. The books I write, although they have happy endings–a requirement in romance, of course–tend to be on the dark side. But every once in awhile, I need something light-hearted–the literary equivalent of an ice cream cone. And when I want to read happy, I’ll usually pick up a romance.

But the Facebook exchange got me thinking. I can’t remember the last time I read a happy book that wasn’t a romance, although cozy mysteries come very close–my faves are the Aunt Dimity books by Nancy Atherton, and the Royal Spyness series by Rhys Bowen. Browsing through Goodreads, it’s hard to find one–every description seems to contain the words “poignant,” “deeply affecting,” “deeply moving,” “haunting,” yadda yadda, which are usually code for “will make you bawl until snot comes out of your eyes.” I’m sure they’re great books, but they’re not for me.

So my challenge for you, friends, is to help me come up with a list of feel good books for the summer. Happy, but not happy-ever-after. I found a few that look promising, and they’re on my TBR list for an upcoming road trip to Massachusetts and Maine:

 

The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society. The title alone is enough. I actually read and finished this book after I drafted this post. Read it. You must, must read it.

 

 

The Whistling Season. Aptly demonstrating the power of a good blurb.

 

 

 

My Lady Jane. I’m not entirely sure how happy this will be–Lady Jane Grey didn’t exactly have a happy ending–but I am intrigued nonetheless.

 

 

 

 

What books do you recommend, or have on your TBR list?

About Marin McGinnis

About Marin McGinnis Clevelanders are tough, a bit cynical, and just a little crazy, and Marin McGinnis is no exception. When she’s not chasing after big dogs or watching tweens skate around hockey rinks, she is immersing herself in Victorian era romance. She lives in Northeast Ohio with her husband, son, and two standard poodles named Larry and Sneaky Pete. You can find her here, at marinmcginnis.com, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, and Pinterest.

A Loveable Heroine–Guest Post

Creating a Lovable Heroine

by Emily Mims

I’m going to make a confession right now.  Writing a lovable heroine didn’t always come easy for me.  I have been taken to task time and time again by my editors and occasionally by my readers because my heroines have not been the nicest people in the world.  Oh, they weren’t cruel or vicious or evil.  They didn’t deliberately set out to steal or cause trouble or hurt others in the story.  But somehow they weren’t all that likeable either, at least not in the first draft.  Unlike my heroes, who the readers and I fall in love with right along with the heroine, my heroines could sometimes seem cold and aloof and uncaring.  And I had to change that, because along with falling in love with the hero, my readers also have to care about the heroine.  They have to like her and root for her and really, really want her to have her happily ever after.  Otherwise, why read her story?

So I had to sit down and think.  Why were my heroines coming off less than wonderful?  Why was I writing them so cold?  A part of it was because I wanted my heroines to be very, very strong women.  I grew up reading a generation of romance novels in which the women were seldom portrayed as strong.  They were young, pretty, and just marking time until a rich, handsome older man came along (or rode up on his steed) and swept her off her feet.  Or they let themselves be a doormat, both for the hero and for just about anyone else who cared to use them in that manner.  I had a lot of fun reading those books but I would also get aggravated.  No way, I would think.  Where is her spine?  Where is her gumption?  Where is her career?  Where is the strong woman I want to read about?  Where is the strong woman I want to be?  My heroines would be different!

And so at first I over-compensated.  My heroines were strong and independent all right, but at the same time cold and brilliant and emotionless–or they were until my editor at Candlelight Ecstasy sat down with me and together we looked at my ladies.  She took me page by page through the first few novels I wrote for her, patiently pointing out the places where my heroines were cold and needed to be ‘warmed up’.  “Don’t make her so perfect,” she said to me.  “Put her in a ratty robe and let her have laundry on the sofa.  Make her human.”  And that went for my heroine’s relationship with the hero.  She could be strong, but she has to be loving as well.  She has to care about him and it has to show.

I like to think I paid close attention and learned.  But I struggle still.  In the first read-through of ‘Solomon’s Choice’, my first book in the Texas Hill Country series, Caroline Stern was very cold, frozen in grief over her dead husband, bitter about the time lost with her child and totally uncompromising in her attitude toward Jack Briscoe, under the circumstances perfectly natural reactions–but not very attractive ones.  So, taking the advice of a trusted reader I warmed her up and gave her compassion for Jack, a fellow victim of a cruel plot and the father of her child.  I was more careful with my next heroine.  Captain Holly Riley, the heroine of ‘Daughter of Valor’, is a wounded warrior who is understandably unhappy with the turn her life has taken, but she has channeled her frustration into helping her wounded warrior friends who are worse off than she, and in spite of her amusing tendency to pop out orders her soldiers and the four year old daughter of the hero adore her.  Christi of ‘Welcome Home’ helps paraplegic Tommy Joe adjust to his new life in a wheelchair and Emily Riley of the upcoming novella ‘Unexpected Assets’ is able to look past her hero’s horrible scarring to see the wonderful man within. And what can I say about Angie Baxter, my heroine of the next full-length book in the Texas Hill Country series ‘Never and Always’?  This woman stayed with an abusive husband because of her love for her beloved stepson.  I made sure that her love for the boy shone from every page of the book.

So what qualities did I finally learn to create in my heroines?  These days, they are strong, yes, but I’m also careful to make them caring of the hero and others around them.  Caroline shells the pecans in her yard to make Jack pecan pies.  Holly buys special pots and pans for one of her warriors so he can get a job as a chef.  Angie bakes special cakes for her son.  They are less than perfect–I let them get tired and frazzled and frightened and down–but they never let life defeat them.  They accept or learn to accept the heroes for who they are, or better yet, help the heroes become better men than they were. And they too grow in the story.  They are better women on the last page of the book than they were on the first.  And we love them for it.

***

Together Cathy and Beto have faced horror and heartbreak. Will they together find their way back to happiness?

What was to be the first night of the rest of their lives together instead became an evening of heartbreak and horror. Now dealing with the aftermath, Cathy Armbruster and Beto Flores struggle to put their lives and their relationship back together. Was their future destroyed on that fateful night, or will Cathy and Beto find a way to get past the heartbreak and claim the happily ever after with one another that they both want so desperately?

Buy Links:

http://www.amazon.com/After-Heartbreak-Emily-Mims-ebook/dp/B00NP7N4SK/
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/477608
https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-aftertheheartbreak-1630094-149.html

When wounded war hero Holly Riley comes home to the Texas Hill Country to build a new life for herself, she has no idea that life will include sexy Congressional candidate Jimmy Adamcik!

Wounded war hero Holly Riley has come to the lakeshore community of Heaven’s Point to recover from her injuries and build a new life for herself with her band of fellow wounded warriors. Temporarily employed as a nanny be charismatic Congressional candidate and neighbor Jimmy Adamcik, Holly and Jimmy quickly began to care for one another in spite of Holly’s distrust of politics. But Jimmy finds himself sucked deeper and deeper into the seamy side of the political process, and an old enemy from Jimmy’s past targets Holly’s soldiers one by one. Will Jimmy and Holly’s love survive the double onslaught-or will they be the final target of their unknown enemy’s rage?

Buy Links
http://www.amazon.com/Daughter-Valor-Emily-Mims-ebooks/dp/B00S0H8LBA
http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/508976
http://allromanceebooks.com/product-daughterofvalor-1720943-149.html

Welcome Home
Tommy Joe is home from war, but he’s now in a wheelchair-and always will be. Can he still be the man a woman like Christi deserves?

Crippled by a sniper’s bullet, paraplegic Tommy Joe Reece doesn’t see how he can run a ranch from a wheelchair-or be a husband to Christi, the girl he’s always loved. Will Tommy and Christi let their doubts and fears about the future destroy their love, or will they have the courage to reach out to one another and find a way to make it all work?

Buy Links:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Welcome-Home-emily-mims-ebook/dp/B00S1AWDPQ

http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/509051

https://www.allromanceebooks.com/product-welcomehome-1720959-149.html

***

Emily_W_Mims_2012Writing was not San Antonio teacher Emily Mims’ first love-in fact, she wrote her firstnovel on a dare.  “I had just finished a romance novel and it was so awful I pitched it across the floor and said I could do better.  My husband Charles promptly dared me to do so.”  She did and although that book didn’t sell, she sold her second book and seventeen more to Candlelight Ecstasy Romances under the name ‘Emily Elliott’.  These books were translated into six languages and sold millions of copies all over the world, and Emily discovered to her delight that she had many stories to tell and that she loved telling them.  But Emily never left the classroom, and when the Candlelight Ecstasy line closed in 1986 she continued with her demanding teaching career and raising two young sons and her storytelling fell by the wayside.  “But the desire to write never really left,” she admits.  “I would be driving down the street making up stories in my head.  Now that I’m no longer in the classroom, I am ready to tell my stories again.”

Again inspired by the thought that she could do better, Emily pitched another novel across the floor and under her own name wrote Solomon’s Choice, set in the Texas Hill Country where Emily and Charles have a second home.  “I love the Hill Country and hope to set several more books there,” she says.  “I also enjoyed incorporating suspense into the story.”  She draws inspiration from the people and places in her life and from the things she loves to do.  “Sometimes my characters are loosely based on someone I know, although by the end of the first chapter they have taken on a life of their own,” she laughs.  “Places aren’t that contrary.”  She also loves to combine her love of writing with some of the other things she loves to do.  “I play dulcimer and ukulele in a folk music group and hope to use this as a background in future work.”

Emily lives in San Antonio with her husband Charles and their five dogs but spends time both in the Hill Country and in Eastern Tennessee.  She would love to hear from each and every one of her readers!

 

About Beth Rhodes

Beth jumps into life with both feet...or head first. Impulsive and spontaneous to a T, she joined Passionate Critters and never looked back. She loves writing and reading, which made this wonderful group of woman a perfect match for her.

Highly Unlikely

February is the Red Hearts Blank Smallmonth for romance. At least from the view of retailers, and all those guys who are not so with it the rest of the year. Whether you’ve found the man of your dreams in real life or not, for us romance fans, there’s a hero just waiting for us in the next story we choose to read. Although he may be digital or between the pages of an actual book, one thing is fairly certain. To the heroine, he’ll be irresistible. And sometimes her polar opposite.

Opposites attract is one of my favorite tropes. For me when the sparks fly and the personal growth happens to a couple who are so different, and yet they manage to find a way to reach a middle ground really works for me. There are so many that have become my favorites over the years. Too many to list here. But my favorite of all time, and one I never get tired of reading is Nora’s Eve Dallas and Roarke.

The straight-laced, uptight cop, who mistrusts people so much she’s almost backward with it, and the charming devil-may-care, Irish con-man, who made the bulk of his fortune illegally. A perfect match!

Ms. Roberts has done a masterful job of weaving personal and relationship growth into every book, keeping their love fresh and entertaining to the reader. Although some of the story lines are serious, there’s plenty of humor to go around. As a reader, it’s pure entertainment.

Do you have a favorite unlikely couple that you enjoy reading about?

About Sutton Fox

Sutton Fox has been published by Lyrical Press, Gypsy Shadow Publishing and wrote a bi-monthly column for an auto racing magazine for several years. She traded life in Bluegrass Country for life in the Windy City in a home she shares with The Man, a lonely cat, and her beloved dog, Lucy. When she’s not working the edj, you can find her writing or spending time with her extended family.

Editing in the New Year

Christmas-Drinks

 

Share a drink. Light your firecrackers. Kiss your loved one… cause it’s all up hill from there.

Beth, here. Hosting our New Year on the blog, Through Heart-Shaped Glasses, and we are ready to take over the writing world with success. [okay, yes. Our world is relative, but still. It’s time to start a new year, and we are doing it with vigor.] As you know, we love books around here. We write them. We critique them. We read them…

We want to talk about them.

And we’ll share them, too.

So, come on in and sit a while. It’s time to meet a few editors who also love books, love stories. Today I’ve got Julie Naughton answering my questions, as well as a feature for her associate, Shannon Combs. Maybe this year, YOU can get that ms whipped into shape and sent off to an editor you met through Heart-Shaped Glasses. <3

~*~*~

Lemons Editing Group

(Beth: just going to say it. I love that their acronym spells LEG)

10678705_704185259666624_3264590522941045976_nWhen life gives you lemons, you make lemonade! But first you’ve got to squeeze them and zest them and add just the right amount of sugar… Just when you’ve got the mixture absolutely perfect, some bossy know-it-all comes along and tells you it tastes bad.

That’s the experience a lot of authors expect when they approach an editor – their hard-won words being heartlessly picked over, criticized and judged.

That doesn’t have to be the case. The reason we’re in the business of editing is that we LOVE books. We live for them. We are to manuscripts what crazy cat ladies are to kittens – we want to play with them, nurture them and watch them grow into gorgeous, quirky, unique beings. We love books, so we love writers, and we want you to succeed.

That’s why approaching an editor doesn’t have to be an intimidating experience. We’ll work with you to make sure your prose sizzles and your characters jump off the page. We’ll nurse you through writer’s block and discouraging reviews. And when you gain readers, reviewers and sales, we’ll celebrate right along with you.

If you’ve been thinking about hiring an editor but have questions or concerns or don’t know what to expect, drop us a line at LifeGivesYouLemons.edits@gmail.com and let us know what we can do to help you.

***

Julie Naughton

How would you define success as an editor? Being able to make a living doing something I love. Which I can, and I’m immensely grateful for that.

What kinds of editing (or what part of editing) do you most (and least) enjoy? Why? I love content editing and helping authors to make their work the very best it can possibly be. Erotic romance is by far my favorite genre (especially stories with Rubenesque heroines and BDSM themes), but if it has words, I will happily edit it.

When someone gives you something to edit, what do you do? I first read through the entire thing, make broad notes to myself, then go back and start editing line by line.

What made you choose editing? I’ve always known that I wanted to make a living doing something with words. I double-majored in journalism and English (with a concentration in creative writing) in college. I am a newspaper reporter by day, so I get my writing in at the day job and then edit by night. When I discovered erotic romance, I knew I’d found my niche — after spending large amounts of my day-job salary purchasing it, I decided to try editing it. I also review romance, self-help, general fiction and general non-fiction for Publishers Weekly, have written several romance and new-adult roundup pieces for PW, and have been a quarterfinal judge in the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Awards (ABNA) contest for the past four years.

What really gets your engine revving in a book? [in other words] What do you like to see in the submissions you get at Lemons Editing Group? I love BDSM themes and Rubenesque heroines. But really, the main thing that gets me going in any book is a coherent plot. If a plot is too far-fetched it will drag me out of the story in about three seconds flat, even if the prose is decent.

What is one of your writing pet peeves? Using the possessive as the plural. IT MAKES ME BATSHIT CRAZY. Just sayin’. Using that rather than who to refer to people is also likely to get me going, and not in a good way.

Do you have a favorite author? If so, who is it and how have they influenced your career? That’s a really, really hard question to answer because I’ve had the great good fortune to work with some incredibly talented authors. One of my first editing projects at my old publisher was doing a co-edit on Mari Carr’s book Screaming Orgasm — I was totally having a fangirl moment. Editing Lolita Lopez’s Grabbed books and Jan Springer’s menage series was a blast. I’ve also loved discovering really terrific writers from the slush pile — authors such as Lea Griffith, Kirstie Abbot, Elizabeth Finn and L.J. Fine. That’s incredibly rewarding.

Just for fun:
Leather or lace? Lace
Black or red? Black
Satin sheets or Egyptian cotton? Egyptian cotton
Ocean or mountains? Ocean
City life or country life? Country life
Hunky heroes or average Joe? Average Joe
Party life or quiet dinner for two? Quiet dinner for two
Dogs or cats? Cats (even though I’m allergic to them!)

Julie Naughton2Types of editing offered: content, line, ghostwriting
Editing strengths: contemporary erotic romance; expertise in non-fiction, romance, general fiction, journalism and self-help as well
Editing Weaknesses: historical (pre-1900; very comfortable with 20th Century history)
Any special editing skills: (IE historical knowledge, tech savvy, Brit
to English spellings, professional knowledge of specific industries): professional expertise of publishing, fashion, beauty industries, legal matters and military operations (particularly the USMC); freelance writer for Publishers Weekly for 7-plus years; decent at Brit to English spellings due to editing multiple British authors at EC. Also have a freakish sense for spelling and most types of grammar (excluding lie/lay.)
Any genres or types of books you do NOT want to work on?: No, but I’m not at all confident with historicals. Regencies TERRIFY me and I’m not really into shifters and vampires. My favorites/strengths are contemporary erotic romance, particularly with BDSM, Rubenesque, military and multiple partner themes. But I’ve never met a manuscript I couldn’t be persuaded to edit.
Part time/Full time?: Part time for now, but working toward full time.
Anything else beneficial: Double majored in journalism and English (concentration on creative writing) in college. Have been a journalist for 23-plus years. First published nationally at 18 🙂 I’m told (by Kelli Collins, former EC editor-in-chief) that I’m really good with authors. Heck, I know how strongly I feel about my own writing, so I strive to bring that sensitivity to working with others. 🙂

 

Shannon Combs

shannon CombsTypes of editing offered: developmental, content, copy/line, proofreading, ghostwriting
Editing strengths: Character development & behavior, timelines, consistency, pointing out ways to create more powerful sentences
Editing Weaknesses: Historical/Regency
Any special editing skills: Tech savvy, Brit to English spellings/terminology
Any genres or types of books you do NOT want to work on?: Inspirational
Part time/Full time?: Full time
Anything else beneficial: Tactful with authors and good at communicating what is needed and why.

About Beth Rhodes

Beth jumps into life with both feet...or head first. Impulsive and spontaneous to a T, she joined Passionate Critters and never looked back. She loves writing and reading, which made this wonderful group of woman a perfect match for her.

  • OUR LATEST BUZZ!

    The first two books in the Cupid's Cafe series release in June by Lori Sizemore and Landra Graf *** Lori Sizemore's Infamous released on December 14. *** Julie Jarnagin's Cowgirl in the Kitchen is available now. *** Bethanne Strasser LETTERS FROM HOME from Entangled Publishing is available now! *** Nina Croft's latest books, Her Fantasy Husband, a hot contemporary romance from Entangled's Brazen line, and The Order Boxed Set, a compilation of the three full length novels, plus a new novella, exclusive to the boxed set, both released in April 2016 *** Debora Dennis's holiday novella, CUPCAKES & CUPID is available.