Editor Spotlight — Sutton Fox

LoneStarTroubleWelcome Sutton Fox from Hearts Desire Press. A fairly new publishing house, they are making ground in the romance industry, acquiring and publishing romance with heat levels ranging from erotic to sweet.

Heart-Shaped Glasses is always interested in what editors are up to, so we’ve created a little spot, just to get the nitty-gritty down and out there. Send us your questions! Send us your curiosities…

And when you see something you like, don’t be afraid to submit! That’s what we’re here for…

We sent over a few probing questions for Sutton and this was what she had to say.

How would you define success as an editor?

Before we get started, let me just say a big ‘Thank You’ to the fabulous ladies of Heart-Shaped Glasses for having me today. I’m honored to be here.

And we’re glad to have you!…

SONY DSCSuccess for me is enhancing an author’s authentic voice and helping it shine throughout the story. Editing is all about collaboration. When the author and I have given our all to a story, and produced a product that we are excited to bring to market, it’s incredibly gratifying.

What kinds of editing (or what part of editing) do you most (and least) enjoy? Why?

Delving into a new story is the most enjoyable thing for me. It’s like opening a Christmas present. Even though I’ve read the synopsis, it’s thrilling to peel it back layer by layer and see how the author plays things out.

What I enjoy least is writing rejection letters. As an author, I’ve had my share of rejections and they all sting. Although it’s a necessary part of the job, it’s the one I don’t like at all.

When someone gives you something to edit, what do you do?

Right out of the box, I simply read. As a reader. I don’t look at what needs work. That comes later. First and foremost, the story needs to reach out and grab my interest. The good ones do. The others, not so much. Once it’s captured my attention and kept it, then I move on to the practical side, because at that point it becomes about the nuts and bolts of writing.

What made you choose editing?

I’ve been an avid reader for more than thirty years, a writer for more years than I can count, and a published author for more than eight years. Perhaps it was a natural progression. One day I realized I enjoyed helping others to refine their stories just as much as I like writing my own. After so many years, and so many classes I realized that maybe in this way I could give back to the craft that’s given so much to me. I’m lucky the publishing industry of today allows me to do both.

What really gets your engine revving in a book? [in other words] What do you like to see in the submissions you get at HEARTS DESIRE PRESS?

Our interests are broad at HDP. We love a good story, period. Contemporary romance and New Adult romance are hot right now, but we also enjoy time travel, erotic romance or a historical tale. It doesn’t matter the time period or the actual setting. If an author writes their best story, it shows up on the page.

What is one of your writing pet peeves?

They change with the seasons I think. Every story brings something unique to the table, but there are two issues that come immediately to mind. The first is being aware of the difference between telling vs. showing, and when to use each. The other is the importance of understanding the difference between passive voice and active voice.

Do you have a favorite author? If so, who is it and how have they influenced your career?

I have many favorites in many genres and all for different reasons. The one that stands out most in romance and romantic suspense is Nora Roberts. She’s prolific, consistent, funny, and professional.
Over the years she’s written stories that have provided an entertaining escape, a breather if you will, from some difficult situations for just a little while. It seems a small thing, but sometimes when life applies the pressure; it helps make things more bearable to just think about something else for a bit. If I could provide someone else that pleasurable relief through editing or writing, all the years of study and work would be worth it.

Dont_Say_NoAbout Hearts Desire Press

Hearts Desire Press is a small, romance only, independent publisher, specializing in adult fiction.

From sweet romance to erotic romance, we publish in digital and print formats. Please see our submissions page for
details. We are a royalty paying publisher, NOT a vanity press, and we do not offer an advance.

Our titles are from established authors and new undiscovered talent. For everyone here, it is our hearts’ desire to
bring you the very best in romance!

It’s time. At HDP we believe it’s time for a publisher who sees an author as a valuable partner in the world of publishing, and treats them like one. You can call us a hybrid publisher, you can call us a small press, in fact, there will be some who’ll call us plain crazy.

HDP is made up of publishing industry professionals who believe an author should have a choice other than traditional and self-publishing. We believe all successful writers work hard to hone their craft. Let us help you continue to shape your career and take it in the direction YOU want to go.

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About Beth Rhodes

Beth jumps into life with both feet...or head first. Impulsive and spontaneous to a T, she joined Passionate Critters and never looked back. She loves writing and reading, which made this wonderful group of woman a perfect match for her.

New Release — Becky Lower

For all our Historical Romance fans… out September 1st, The Duplicitous Debutante.

roses2In 1859, ladies of New York society were expected to do three things well: find a husband, organize a smooth-running household, and have children.

Rosemary Fitzpatrick’s agenda is very different. As the author of the popular Harry Hawk dime novels, she must hide her true identity from her new publisher, who assumes the person behind the F. P. Elliott pen name is male. She must pose as his secretary in order to ensure the continuation of her series. And in the midst of all this subterfuge, her mother is insisting that she become a debutante this year.

Henry Cooper is not the typical Boston Brahmin. Nor is he a typical publisher. He’s entranced by Mr. Elliott’s secretary the moment they meet, and wonders how his traditional-thinking father will react when he brings a working class woman into the family. Because his intentions are to marry her, regardless.

Rosemary’s deception begins to unravel at the Cotillion ball, when Henry recognizes her. The secretarial mask must come off, now that he knows she is a member of New York society. But she can’t yet confess who she truly is until she knows if Henry will accept her as F. P. Elliott.

The more time they spend together, the closer they become. But when Rosemary reveals her true identity to him, will Henry be able to forgive her or has her deceit cost her the man she loves?

~*~*~

lower authorpicBecky Lower has traveled the country looking for great settings for her novels. She loves to write about two people finding each other and falling in love, amid the backdrop of a great setting, be it on a covered wagon headed west in the 1850s or present day middle America. Historical and contemporary romances are her specialty. Becky is a PAN member of RWA and is a member of the Historic and Contemporary RWA chapters. She has a degree in English and Journalism from Bowling Green State University, and lives in an eclectic college town in Ohio with her puppy-mill rescue dog, Mary. She loves to hear from her readers at beckylowerauthor@gmail.com. Visit her website at www.beckylowerauthor.com

~*~*~

Excerpt:

Harry Hawk and the Tycoon’s Daughter—Book Six in the Harry Hawk Series

Harry Hawk stared down the barrel of his Colt .45. A huge Sioux Indian was in his sights, but was holding the girl in front of him as a shield. Her eyes were as big as saucers as she struggled against the man, and she trembled as she kept her eyes on the end of Harry’s gun.

New York City, March 1859

Rosemary Fitzpatrick laid her fountain pen on the paper, oblivious to the blob of ink that fell from its tip and damaged the page. She picked up the letter she had received earlier in the day.

It was her own gun, and she was staring down the barrel.

The letter informed her that her publisher, Page Books, had been sold, as Mr. Page had retired. The new company, Cooper and Son Publishing, was sending an envoy from Boston to New York to meet with all the authors. And to decide whom to keep.

She read the words between the lines. And whom to cut.

She had never met Mr. Page. All their correspondence had been through the post. So Mr. Page had no idea one of his best-selling dime novel authors was a woman. F.P. Elliott was the name she’d come up with when she was only fourteen and submitted her first story, not once imagining she’d become one of Mr. Page’s most productive and popular authors.

She had only two days in which to find someone to impersonate F.P. Elliott.

Rosemary ran her ink-stained fingers through her hair as she pondered what to do. The logical choice, and her only real hope, was her older brother Halwyn. But he was married now and settled. And, despite the fact he loved his sister, Rosemary doubted he’d ever cracked open one of her books.

Well, it was worth a try, anyway. She hastily stood, removed her pinafore—which was covered in purplish-blue stains resembling bruises, but protected her dress—patted her hair back in place, and glided down the steps from her garret study in the four-story townhouse to the main level, where she encountered her mother in the drawing room.

“Oh, good. I was just on my way upstairs to find you. Do come in.”

Rosemary took a seat opposite her mother, who picked up the embroidery she had been working on. Rosemary took a moment to smooth her pale blue muslin dress and inhaled her mother’s subtle, comforting scent of lilacs before she brought her eyes up.

“Mother, I have a problem.”

Her mother glanced up from her needlework. “Well, if it’s a problem with one of your stories, I’m afraid I can’t help you. I don’t know where you get your ideas. Help yourself to some tea and a bit of Cook’s tangy lemon cake, why don’t you?”

Rosemary rose and poured herself a cup of tea, forgoing the cake. “Well, indirectly, it is about my stories.” She took a deep breath. “Mr. Page has retired and he’s sold the company to a Boston publisher.

Charlotte Fitzpatrick’s eyes locked on Rosemary’s. “Oh, dear.”

“Precisely. And the new publisher is sending someone to New York in two days to interview all the authors Mr. Page currently has under contract. They insist upon an in- person visit. Whatever can I do?”

Charlotte tapped her finger on her teeth for a moment, before her face broke into a smile. “We’ll just have to find someone to be Mr. Elliott! What about your father?”

“Papa’s way too busy to spend an afternoon impersonating me. I was thinking more along the lines of Halwyn.”

“Hmmm. I suppose either of them would be a good choice. They can certainly think on their feet. But has either of them read your stories? Do they know where your inspiration for Harry Hawk comes from?”

“No, I don’t think either of them cares. They merely pat me on the head and tell me they’re glad I have a ‘hobby’ that keeps me off the streets and away from the Bloomers and their demonstrations for women’s rights.”

“All right then. Here’s what I suggest. You can prepare a series of questions about your stories, not just your characters but also about your current contract with Mr. Page, and administer the test to both your father and brother. Halwyn and Grace are coming over for dinner tonight, so your timing is perfect. Whoever does the best on the test will be the one to impersonate your Mr. Elliott.” Charlotte clapped her hands together.

“Your idea might just work,” Rosemary replied as a touch of excitement washed over her. “I’ll compose the pertinent questions this afternoon.”

Her mother patted her hand. “Surely we New Yorkers can pull the wool over a Boston Brahmin any day of the week.” She set aside her needlework and picked up the most recent copy of Godey’s fashion magazine. “Now we must discuss the important business of your debut next month. That’s the real reason I wanted to talk to you.”

“Must I still go through with this archaic European folly?”

Charlotte fixed a level stare on her daughter. “It is neither archaic nor European anymore. Judging from its success in finding suitable partners for our young ladies of society since its introduction into American culture five years ago, I must say it’s a convention that’s here to stay. I let you talk me out of it last year, when you should have had your season, simply because I was exhausted from planning the weddings of your two sisters. But no more dawdling, Rosemary. 1859 has to be your year. You’re nineteen and must begin entertaining the idea of getting married. Besides, if the talk of war between the States evolves into actual battle, the Cotillion may be cancelled temporarily—at least until we take care of the Southerners and free all the slaves. You may not have another chance to find a husband for years.”

Charlotte pointed to a gown in the magazine. “Jasmine has already created a lovely white gown for your coming-out ball, but we must think beyond the dance, to the entire season. We’ll have a formal dinner in the weeks following the dance. How about a dress such as this?”

Rosemary placed a hand on her stomach, which now knotted with anxiety on top of her excitement. “Mother, I can’t think of dinners or ball gowns right now. My entire future is in jeopardy.”

“Quit being so melodramatic, for goodness’s sake. I’m quite certain your father or brother can come up with a solution, so indulge me a bit and let’s talk dresses. After all, having a wonderful season is part of your future, too.”

”I’m sure whatever you decide will be fine, Mother. I need to get to work on my questions for Papa and Halwyn.”

Rosemary’s stomach calmed a bit as she rose and went back to the garret to compose her test. Maybe her mother’s idea would work. Perhaps her father or brother could pull it off.

About Beth Rhodes

Beth jumps into life with both feet...or head first. Impulsive and spontaneous to a T, she joined Passionate Critters and never looked back. She loves writing and reading, which made this wonderful group of woman a perfect match for her.

The way to a man’s heart…

We’ve all heard it, I’m sure. The way to a man’s heart is through his stomach. As an author, I’ve taken this sentiment seriously and, if you read my first book, Can’t Shake You, you probably know what I’m talking about. My heroine, Carissa, on more than one occasion, either brings food to or cooks for the hero. This is a theme I’ve noticed myself following in coming River Bend books. Why? It’s probably mostly because I’m a total foodie, but also because I’m a small town gal and it’s part of our nature…our culture even…to shower our loved ones–especially the guys in our lives–with something to fill their belly with. Could be an ulterior motive. You know, more fuel for more activities and all that. 😉

In Can’t Shake You, Carissa has a Sunday tradition of making Chicken Pot Pie. It’s something she carried into adult life from childhood, much like we’ve probably all carried on traditions. Here is the link to the recipe I make at home. It’s perfect for fall…or any time of year, really…and it’ll warm not only the tummies of the ones you love, but their hearts as well.

Enjoy. 🙂chix

 

About Molly Mclain

Molly is a talker. Get her chatting about books (or book boyfriends) and she can go for hours. Socializing is her favorite part of blogging with a bunch of like-minded authors. It's like having coffee with your friends at all hours of the day. Molly also likes coffee. A lot. Blogging at HSG? It's a win-win in Molly's book!

Guest Blogger – Zoe York

There’s nothing yummier than a man in uniform. Soldiers, police officers, fire fighters, paramedics, I love them all.

When I first started writing romances, I resisted the military hero because I’m married to one in real life, and my mother-in-law reads my books, and it all just felt a little too close to home. But after writing a SEAL novella for the Seals of Summer military romance superbundle, I had the bug in a big way.

My new series, Pine Harbour, is a spin-off of my first series. I call it Wardham with choppier waves and craggier bluffs. It’s a small-town contemporary romance series, but it centres on two families, the Fosters and the Minellis, who have a long record of military service. Eight heroes, tied together through blood, friendship and a sense of duty.

The first book in the series, Love in a Small Town, comes out next week.  And I’m happy to report that while Rafe Minelli is an army reservist like my husband, that’s where the similarities end. Well, except for the kissing, maybe. But for the most part, my fears about writing so close to home were unfounded. Love in a Small Town is 100% Rafe and Olivia’s story, and I really loved writing it.

Here’s an exclusive sneak peek at one of the release day teaser quotes: LiaSTreleaseTEASER1

“You smell pretty,” she whispered as she sashayed past him. He was going to miss that little apron when she stopped working there. He wanted to fold her over his lap and spank her soundly for being cheeky. “And you look…frustrated,” she added after she filled his cup. She set the carafe to the side and leaned across the counter, kissing him lightly on the cheek.

He shot his hand out and cupped the back of her neck, holding her in place. “That’s not a good morning kiss,” he muttered, trying to keep a smile at bay.

She arched one eyebrow and took a deep breath, her pupils dilating. “Oh no?”

He shook his head and pulled them back together, ignoring the dozen or so other people in the place. They could all go to hell. There was only one way he wanted his wife to kiss him in the morning—long, hard and dirty.

Blurb:

SixLoveInASmallTownAug2014medium (2) years. Two break ups. One divorce. They should be over each other.

Police officer and army reservist Rafe Minelli knows better than to tell his wife no, particularly since they aren’t married anymore. She can’t hightail it out of town, though, not when they’ve finally broken through the post-divorce cold war status quo.

Olivia Minelli needs to leave Pine Harbour. It’s just too hard to see Rafe moving on without her—even if he says he doesn’t want to. But when a new and exciting job falls into her lap, she needs to choose: protect her heart, or take the new job and risk getting emotionally entangled with her ex-husband. Again.

Love in a Small Town is available now for pre-order at the following retailers: Amazon | iBooks | Barnes & Noble | Kobo

 

Biography:1932292_1460623590821883_899296854_n

New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Zoe York is a busy working mom of two young boys, wife to a very understanding soldier, and creator of modern, sexy, small town contemporary romances. She lives in London, Ontario and is currently chugging Americanos, wiping sticky fingers, and dreaming of heroes in and out of uniform.

Connect with her on Facebook, Twitter and on her website.

About Molly Mclain

Molly is a talker. Get her chatting about books (or book boyfriends) and she can go for hours. Socializing is her favorite part of blogging with a bunch of like-minded authors. It's like having coffee with your friends at all hours of the day. Molly also likes coffee. A lot. Blogging at HSG? It's a win-win in Molly's book!

Can’t Beat the Classics

It’s Movie Month here at HSG, and thus far the blog has been conspicuously lacking in mention of classic movies. I have always been a fan of classic films–this is undoubtedly due to my mother, who watched Thin Man movies with me in my infancy. I still love The Thin Man, and just about anything with Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, or Fred Astaire.

Inspired by my son, with whom I have recently begun to watch every James Bond movie in chronological order, the other day I watched Charade on Netflix, with a 59-year-old Cary Grant and a much younger Audrey Hepburn. In addition to those two, the cast was a who’s who of talent–James Coburn, George Kennedy, Walter Matthau. It’s been a little while since I indulged myself in this way, and what struck me the most, besides the banter that you never see onscreen nowadays outside of Aaron Sorkin or Joss Whedon, were the funny little moments: Matthau doing squats while on the phone with Hepburn, for example. It was subtle, easy to miss if you weren’t paying attention, and very funny.

The movies were often beautiful, too. The opening scenes in To Catch a Thief are stunning, and I still remember watching Rear Window in college–Grace Kelly’s extraordinary face literally filled the screen, and every man in the auditorium gasped aloud. I do enjoy modern movies, but despite the technological advances in filmmaking, they seldom seem to capture beauty the way older films did.

Although I never really thought about this before, it occurs to me that I look for similar qualities in the books I read. I recently finished Julia Quinn’s The Sum of All Kisses, which has many of the same qualities as a classic romantic comedy. Her writing is quirky, lighthearted, sexy, and funny as hell. Eloisa James is poetic, with sometimes heartbreakingly lovely descriptions of places, people, and emotions. There is beauty and innocence, in their writing and that of many other talented authors, which makes a refreshing change from the fast-paced, non-subtle world we inhabit.

Perhaps by this post I am revealing that I sometimes think I was born in the wrong decade–or century–but I also think there are definitely times when, no matter when you were born or what world you inhabit, it is good to sit back and enjoy a simpler life, even if only for the time it takes to watch a movie or read a novel.

So what about you? Classic movie fan? Favorites?

 

About Marin McGinnis

About Marin McGinnis Clevelanders are tough, a bit cynical, and just a little crazy, and Marin McGinnis is no exception. When she’s not chasing after big dogs or watching tweens skate around hockey rinks, she is immersing herself in Victorian era romance. She lives in Northeast Ohio with her husband, son, and two standard poodles named Larry and Sneaky Pete. You can find her here, at marinmcginnis.com, Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, and Pinterest.

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